THE NOMINEES FOR THE VARIOUS CATEGORIES OF THE MAIDEN SADAP AFRICA’S BEACONS OF HOPE FOR PHILANTHROPY AWARDS 2017.

CATEGORY ONE: AFRICA’S BEACONS OF HOPE FOR PHILANTHROPY AWARDS 2017-to recognize Top-Ten African Most Generous Givers (private entrepreneurs) who gave away over $10m to different charitable causes-education, health, women and youth empowerment and poverty reduction measure-within and outside their home countries to advance the course of humanity. Their attitude to selfless giving has crowned them as pace setters of modern philanthropy in Africa which has earned them these awards.

The Awardees for this category are:

Francois van Niekerk is a successful South African entrepreneur and award-winning philanthropist. He is the founder of the Mertech Group of Companies and the Co-founder/chairman of Atterbury Investment Holdings.

Besides work engagements, van Niekerk serves as trustee of the Foundation of Children with Hearing Loss, as council member of University of South Africa (UNISA) and the Director of Sabinet Online. He also founded Mergon Foundation in 2012 and he is the Chairman of the foundation. This is where his philanthropic activities are mainly conducted.

Van Niekerk is not on the first fifteen Forbes lists of wealthiest Africans but was recently rated by the same Forbes Magazine as one of the top five notable givers in Africa. Van Niekerk stirred up the spirit of modern philanthropy when he gave away 70% of his equity in his company, the Mertech Group, valued at $170 million. This huge sum was given to the Mergon foundation a charitable trust he co-founded with his wife.

The Mergon Foundation, fund education, health and skills-building initiatives in Southern African countries. The Foundation also helps to fund several ministries for up to three years at a time, and also funds projects that include training and equipping ministries, transforming communities, youth ministries and young entrepreneurs.

Also, not on the Forbes’ list of first fifteen richest people in Africa, Allen Gray has contributed enormously to social causes, especially in education development and promotion across South Africa with estimated donation of $150 million through his foundation, the Allen Gray Orbis foundation. His foundation offers full high school scholarships that will take care of tuition, hostel fees and basic operating cost at selected top South African Schools. He is the owner of Allan Gray investment management firm, which gave his Allan Gray Orbis Foundation, the $150 million which the foundation uses to give high school scholarships and supports other charitable causes. Also, not on the Forbes’ list of first fifteen richest people in Africa, Allen Gray has contributed enormously to social causes, especially in education development and promotion across South Africa with estimated donation of $150 million through his foundation, the Allen Gray Orbis foundation.

. His foundation offers full high school scholarships that will take care of tuition, hostel fees and basic operating cost at selected top South African Schools. He is the owner of Allan Gray investment management firm, which gave his Allan Gray Orbis Foundation, the $150 million which the foundation uses to give high school scholarships and supports other charitable causes.

Gray established the Allan Gray Foundation in 2007 with a US$130 million endowment to fund bursaries and scholarships for talented South African high school students. This was the largest single recorded donation to a charity in South Africa at the time. In 1979, he founded the Allan and Gill Gray Charitable Trust and in 2016, he donated his entire stake in his company to the Allan and Gill Gray Charitable Trust so that dividends from his share in both the South African company and the Orbis Group can be exclusively used for philanthropic purposes. His stake in Allan Gray Investment Management was said to be about US$10.5 billion (105 billion South African Rand) as at 2013.

General Theophilus Yakubu Danjuma (Rtd.) popularly known as T.Y Danjuma, is a Nigerian business tycoon and one time Minister of Defense under President Olusegun Obasanjo’s civilian government. He is also the chairman of South Atlantic Petroleum. He broke Nigerian philanthropic records when he gave $100-million to set up the TY Danjuma Foundation, a grant-making organization that partners with NGOs in education, health, policy and poverty alleviation initiatives which currently benefits a great number of Nigerians. He also gave $500,000 as a grant to non-governmental organizations (NGOs) in his home state, Taraba State, Nigeria, to address health challenges in the state.
He is referred to as a former South African billionaire but his legacy of philanthropic efforts is a mark that cannot be easily washed away on the sand of time. Donald, before passing the mantle of huge capital based charity to his only daughter, Wendy Appelbaum, who is also a noteworthy giver, has given away over $50 million to medical and has demonstrated in several ways that he is so much interested in good healthcare for his people. Donald Gordon founded a healthcare charitable trust called, the Donald Gordon Foundation, to afford efficient and sustainable healthcare services in communities across South Africa. He single-handedly funded the establishment of the Donald Gordon Teaching Medical Centre at the University of Witwatersrand with a donation of $17 million from his private pocket. He also gave away $33 million to the Wales Millennium Centre and the Royal Opera House in the United Kingdom.
Alhaji Aliko Dangote is a Nigerian industrialist and famous African business tycoon who recently enlisted himself on the list of black philanthropists through his culture of generous giving. Aliko Dangote who is the president of the Dangote Group has already made significant contributions to charity totaling over $35 million. He gave $500,000 for victims of a munitions blast in Brazzaville, Congo in 2012. He also gave $15 million to a Nigerian SME fund, to grant loans to upcoming businessmen and women. His Dangote foundation donated $2 million to a fellowship programme that will build young African leaders and also donated $2 million to the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) to help those who survived the outrageous flood in Pakistan.

In Nigeria, during the immense flood that ravage some part of Lagos, Dangota donated N100 million ($623, 247) to the victims. He also gave out relief materials and N365 million ($2.3 million) to victims of the 2011 post-general election violence in some northern States. He voluntarily donated millions to education and healthcare services across his country home in late 2011 and the list of his charitable giving goes on and on.

Dr. Manu Chandaria is a Kenyan Billionaire businessman and the Chairman/CEO of Comcraft Group of Companies, a billion-dollar enterprise that has a presence in over 40 countries.

Chandaria has made an estimated donation of $12 million to charitable causes. The Kenyan business tycoon donated 100 million shillings ($1.16 million) to Gertrude’s Children’s Hospital which provides healthcare to impoverished Kenyan children. The donation, aimed at improving the intensive care and diagnostic services at the hospital is to fund the construction and installation of equipment in an ultra-modern facility which would be named ‘The Chandaria Medical Centre. Chandaria made the donation through his Chandaria Foundation, which supports causes in education and health.

The Chandaria Foundation which was set up by his family in 1956 by providing 10 per cent of their company shares for the wellbeing of the people of Kenya, “as at today, has substantial assets and has been giving 100 scholarships annually to secondary school students, 60 per cent of them girls and 25 students at universities” Dr. Chandaria said in a statement obtained online. The Chandaria Foundation also donated Kshs. 50 million to University of Nairobi towards the construction of the University Towers and donated another 60 million shillings to Moi Teaching and Refferal Hospital, to help equip the hospital to cater for cancer patients, among other numerous donations.
Patrice Tlhopane Motsepe, is a South African mining magnate. He is the founder and executive chairman of African Rainbow Minerals which has interests in gold, ferrous metals, base metals, and platinum. He also sits on several company boards including being the non-executive chairman of Harmony Gold, the 12th largest gold mining company in the world, and is the deputy chairman of Sanlam. He also owns a football club, Mamelodi Sundowns.

In 2012, Motsepe was named South Africa's richest man, topping the Sunday Times' annual Rich List with an estimated fortune of R20.07 billion ($2.4 billion). In 2013, he joined The Giving Pledge, committing to give half his wealth to charitable causes. The Motsepe family give to charity through their foundation- the Motsepe Foundation. The foundation gives bursary awards to students within the fields related to Engineering, Entrepreneurship, Mathematics, Medical Studies, Sciences, Technology & Business Studies annually. Students in Arts, Agriculture and Law may also be considered. In an effort to uplift the country by uplifting its youth, the Motsepe Foundation currently has 1,200 university students studying in the STEM and Arts fields under the organization’s bursary fund.

Dr Mohammed "Mo" Ibrahim (Arabic: محمد إبراهيم‎‎) is a Sudanese-British mobile communications entrepreneur and billionaire businessman.

In Africa, apart from foundations set up by serving and retired politicians, rich business people, the most prominent is MO Ibrahim Foundation with its MO Ibrahim Prize for Achievement in African Leadership. The Leadership award comes with a cash prize of Sh400 million ($5 million) initial payment and Sh16 million ($200,000) a year for life for the winner. Under the prize, the Sudanese-born British mobile communications entrepreneur honours African heads of state who deliver security, health, education and economic development to their constituents, and who democratically hand over power to their successors. Dr. Ibrahim has pledged to give at least half of his wealth to charity by joining The Giving Pledge.

Strive Masiyiwa is a London based Zimbabwean businessman and entrepreneur. He is Zimbabwe’s richest man and founder of Econet Wireless and a philanthropist of international repute who has spread his philanthropic work to several African countries, including Zimbabwe.

He established a $6.4 million trust in 2012 to pay for the education of 40 students mostly orphans. He has used his wealth to provide scholarships to over 100,000 young Africans over the past 20 years through his family foundation and has as well sponsored so many students at universities in America, The United Kingdom, and China. He also supports organizations that help orphans in Zimbabwe and also funds initiatives in public health and agriculture across the African continent.

Masiyiwa is a member of the Africa Progress Panel (APP), a group of ten distinguished individuals who advocate at the highest levels for equitable and sustainable development in Africa. As a Panel Member, he facilitates coalition building to leverage and broker knowledge, and convenes decision-makers to influence policy for lasting change in Africa. Masiyiwa also sits on two United Nations Advisory Panels and is the only African member of the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum's Committee on Conscience.
According available information, the forty-six years Dikembe Mutombo from Kinshasa, Congo Capital, grew up knowing how to help people by assisting his mother to sell food in the market.

The former NBA’s best player, now a renowned administrator, activist and philanthropist, has brought succour to his country home where health issues has been a major concern. Dikembe donated over $20 million to build the Biaba Marie Mutombo Hospital which he named after his mother who died of stroke in 1997 because she could not get to the hospital. The hospital which is worth $30 million and opened in 2007 is mainly for those who cannot afford the costly hospital bills. His foundation gave 10,000 doses of albendazole, deworming medications to his country after the discovery that hookworm is a severe public health problem in Democratic Republic of Congo. He also championed a campaign that seeks Americans to help fight global AIDS and poverty.

For his endless philanthropic efforts, in 2010 the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation honoured him with Steve Patterson Award for Sport philanthropy.